Pig’s Head

Last night we had the pig’s head for dinner.

I’ve shoved this package from shelf to shelf  in the freezer since its arrival in December.

When I filled out the cut sheet there was this surprising ‘head’ option near the bottom.

I jotted in the x for yes.

The frozen eyes and snout were visible through the packaging.

Yuck.

I wondered why I marked the yes box.

Just like cleaning the carport, eating that head, required company as a motivator.

One out of four families that were invited agreed to come.

The rest politely declined.

All excused themselves for their spouses sake.

Last night our bravest? most cultured?  most adventurous? craziest?  friends arrived for a pig’s head dinner.

I  spent forty-five minutes scraping fuzz and bristles off the head.

Three websites recommended disposable razors for this job.

The razor did serve some purpose but a sharp little knife and a sharp big knife performed best.

The websites showed intact pigs’ heads.

My poor pig had no ears, no eye lids.

My poor pig had large gouges around the eyes and on one side of the snout.

I promptly covered the eyes  and gouges with half apples.

I followed a simple recipe online with a few modifications.

Every recipe I saw recommended two hours of cooking.

By the third hour the internal temp was 140.

I sliced off the thickest parts, laid them in the broth and put it back in the oven for another forty minutes.

The parts up under and back from the non-existent ears were intermittent layers of fat and white meat.

The checks were small bits of dark meat.

The tongue was dense, very dark meat.

Hands down the checks tasted best.

The tongue wasn’t bad but the texture was unusual,

The white meat tasted of fat, was very moist, but quite bland.

The cabbage, cumin, apple, and raisin salad was the best food on the table.

The small amount of cheek meat in no way warranted the

amount of freezer space or work that the head dinner required.

Yet I am glad we tried it.

Adventure is where you make it and this certainly was an adventure.

It was good fun to see everyone’s reactions and interest in the food.

Food is so easy to shovel in and swallow; this meal inspired full attention from the youngest to the most jaded eater.

This morning the chickens and turkeys were thrilled to have such a  large protein chunk to peck apart!

And I was relieved to find that the horrid fat smell that my hands had absorbed was finally gone!

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Pig’s Head

  1. You are my hero! When we got a pig last year i carved out the cheeks for us and hung the head in a tree for the birds. A year later and the bones are still hanging in the tree. The cheeks were eaten long ago.

  2. Kelly, you go beyond my wildest imagination!! Your blog never ceases to amaze me and I love that you are so adventurous and are making such memorable memories.

  3. Very brave of you! I have a memory of encountering the pig’s head (only recently removed from the pig) sitting on the kitchen counter of my uncle’s farmhouse, and have been scarred for life. Still hoping to move beyond it someday, although if I do manage to raise my own hog, I probably won’t check ‘yes’ next to the box for the head.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s